Taormina events

 F E S T I V A L   L I R I C O   D E I   T E A T R I   D I   P I E T R A

La Traviata

By Giuseppe Verdi

Taormina Ancient Theatre, Thursday 24th August 2023 @9.00pm

 

A new production by Coro Lirico Siciliano and Festival Lirico dei Teatri di Pietra: an opera in three acts as a concert
Music: Orchestra Filarmonica of Calabria
Dance: Flamenco Ballet Company of Madrid
Director: Filippo Arlia

 

 

TICKETS on boxol.it and ticketone

Stalls (Parterre): € 85,00
Gallery (central, gold): € 75,00
Gallery (lateral): € 65,00
Upper circle (numbered seats): € 50,00
Upper circle (non-numbered seats): € 27,50 – € 15,00 for Taormina’s residents

 

MORE INFO

Associazione “Coro Lirico Siciliano” – grancoro@hotmail.it – www.facebook.com/coroliricosiciliano

 

WHERE TO STAY

Hotel La Pensione SvizzeraHotel Villa SchulerHotel Villa Ducale – Hotel Villa Carlotta 

 F E S T I V A L   L I R I C O   D E I   T E A T R I   D I   P I E T R A

Ennio Morricone Tribute

Taormina Ancient Theatre, Wednesday 23rd August 20223 @8.30pm

 

 

TICKETS on boxol and ticketone
Platea: € 65,00
Gallery (central): € 55,00
Gallery (lateral): € 44,00
Upper Circle (numbered seats): € 33,00
Upper Circle (non numbered circle): 22,00

 

MORE INFO

Associazione “Coro Lirico Siciliano” – grancoro@hotmail.it – www.facebook.com/coroliricosiciliano

 

WHERE TO STAY

Hotel La Pensione SvizzeraHotel Villa SchulerHotel Villa Ducale – Hotel Villa Carlotta 

 F E S T I V A L   L I R I C O   D E I   T E A T R I   D I   P I E T R A

 

Pink Floyd Tribute

Ancient Theatre, Tuesday 22nd August 2023 @ 9.00pm

 

 

TICKETS on boxol.it and ticketone

Stalls (Parterre): € 65,00
Gallery (central, gold): € 55,00
Gallery (lateral): € 44,00
Upper circle (numbered seats): € 33,00
Upper circle (non-numbered seats): € 22,00 (€ 15,00 for Taormina’s residents)

 

MORE INFO

Associazione “Coro Lirico Siciliano” – grancoro@hotmail.it – www.facebook.com/coroliricosiciliano

 

WHERE TO STAY

Hotel La Pensione SvizzeraHotel Villa SchulerHotel Villa Ducale – Hotel Villa Carlotta 

 

Tosca

Taormina Ancient Theatre, Saturday 19th August 2023 @9.00pm

 

An event by Ajaxspettacoli

TICKETS on ticketone and boxol
Platea: € 100,00
Gallery (central): € 85,00
Gallery (lateral): € 80,00
Upper Circle (numbered seats, central): € 60,00
Upper Circle (numbered seats, lateral): € 50,00
Upper Circle (non numbered circle): € 35,00

 

Synopsis

HISTORICAL CONTEXT
A crowded scene with many soldiers and horses, and much smoke. Some soldiers lie dead or wounded. In the distance, beyond a short line of trees, is a tall church tower.
The Battle of Marengo, as painted by Louis-François Lejeune
According to the libretto, the action of Tosca occurs in Rome in June 1800.[16] Sardou, in his play, dates it more precisely; La Tosca takes place in the afternoon, evening, and early morning of 17 and 18 June 1800.[17]

Italy had long been divided into a number of small states, with the Pope in Rome ruling the Papal States in Central Italy. Following the French Revolution, a French army under Napoleon invaded Italy in 1796, entering Rome almost unopposed on 11 February 1798 and establishing a republic there.[18] Pope Pius VI was taken prisoner, and was sent into exile on February 20, 1798. (Pius VI would die in exile in 1799, and his successor, Pius VII, who was elected in Venice on 14 March 1800, would not enter Rome until 3 July. There is thus neither a Pope nor papal government in Rome during the days depicted in the opera.) The new republic was ruled by seven consuls; in the opera this is the office formerly held by Angelotti, whose character may be based on the real-life consul Liborio Angelucci.[19] In September 1799 the French, who had protected the republic, withdrew from Rome.[20] As they left, troops of the Kingdom of Naples occupied the city.[21]

In May 1800 Napoleon, by then the undisputed leader of France, brought his troops across the Alps to Italy once again. On 14 June his army met the Austrian forces at the Battle of Marengo (near Alessandria). Austrian troops were initially successful; by mid-morning they were in control of the field of battle. Their commander, Michael von Melas, sent this news south towards Rome. However, fresh French troops arrived in late afternoon, and Napoleon attacked the tired Austrians. As Melas retreated in disarray with the remains of his army, he sent a second courier south with the revised message.[22] The Neapolitans abandoned Rome,[23] and the city spent the next fourteen years under French domination.[24]


Act 1

INSIDE THE CHURCH OF SANT’ANDREA DELLA VALLE

Scene depicting a church interior with high stained-glass windows and heavy ornamental columns. The central figure is a high dignatory around whom several figures are kneeling, while in the background can be seen the tall pikes of the Swiss Guard.
The Te Deum scene which concludes act 1; Scarpia stands at left. Photograph of a pre-1914 production at the old Metropolitan Opera House, New York
Cesare Angelotti, former consul of the Roman Republic and now an escaped political prisoner, runs into the church and hides in the Attavanti private chapel – his sister, the Marchesa Attavanti, has left a key to the chapel hidden at the feet of the statue of the Madonna. The elderly Sacristan enters and begins cleaning. The Sacristan kneels in prayer as the Angelus sounds.

The painter Mario Cavaradossi arrives to continue work on his picture of Mary Magdalene. The Sacristan identifies a likeness between the portrait and a blonde-haired woman who has been visiting the church recently (unknown to him, it is Angelotti’s sister the Marchesa). Cavaradossi describes the “hidden harmony” (“Recondita armonia”) in the contrast between the blonde beauty of his painting and his dark-haired lover, the singer Floria Tosca. The Sacristan mumbles his disapproval before leaving.

Angelotti emerges and tells Cavaradossi, an old friend who has republican sympathies, that he is being pursued by the Chief of Police, Baron Scarpia. Cavaradossi promises to assist him after nightfall. Tosca’s voice is heard, calling to Cavaradossi. Cavaradossi gives Angelotti his basket of food and Angelotti hurriedly returns to his hiding place.

Tosca enters and suspiciously asks Cavaradossi what he has been doing – she thinks that he has been talking to another woman. After Cavaradossi reassures her, Tosca tries to persuade him to take her to his villa that evening: “Non la sospiri, la nostra casetta” (“Do you not long for our little cottage”). She then expresses jealousy over the woman in the painting, whom she recognises as the Marchesa Attavanti. Cavaradossi explains the likeness; he has merely observed the Marchesa at prayer in the church. He reassures Tosca of his fidelity and asks her what eyes could be more beautiful than her own: “Qual’occhio al mondo” (“What eyes in the world”).

After Tosca has left, Angelotti reappears and discusses with the painter his plan to flee disguised as a woman, using clothes left in the chapel by his sister. Cavaradossi gives Angelotti a key to his villa, suggesting that he hide in a disused well in the garden. The sound of a cannon signals that Angelotti’s escape has been discovered. He and Cavaradossi hasten out of the church.

The Sacristan re-enters with choristers, celebrating the news that Napoleon has apparently been defeated at Marengo. The celebrations cease abruptly with the entry of Scarpia, his henchman Spoletta and several police agents. They have heard that Angelotti has sought refuge in the church. Scarpia orders a search, and the empty food basket and a fan bearing the Attavanti coat of arms are found in the chapel. Scarpia questions the Sacristan, and his suspicions are aroused further when he learns that Cavaradossi has been in the church; Scarpia mistrusts the painter, and believes him complicit in Angelotti’s escape.

When Tosca arrives looking for her lover, Scarpia artfully arouses her jealous instincts by implying a relationship between the painter and the Marchesa Attavanti. He draws Tosca’s attention to the fan and suggests that someone must have surprised the lovers in the chapel. Tosca falls for his deceit; enraged, she rushes off to confront Cavaradossi. Scarpia orders Spoletta and his agents to follow her, assuming she will lead them to Cavaradossi and Angelotti. He privately gloats as he reveals his intentions to possess Tosca and execute Cavaradossi. A procession enters the church singing the Te Deum; exclaiming ‘Tosca, you make me forget even God!’, Scarpia joins the chorus in the prayer.

 

Act 2

LA PIATTAFORMA DI CASTEL SANT’ANGELO, SET DESIGN FOR TOSCA ACT 3 (UNDATED)

The body of a man lies supine, with a woman, crucifix in hand, kneeling over him. A candle is placed to each side of his head.
Tosca reverently lays a crucifix on Scarpia’s body. Photograph of a pre-1914 production at the old Metropolitan Opera House, New York
Scarpia’s apartment in the Palazzo Farnese, that evening

Scarpia, at supper, sends a note to Tosca asking her to come to his apartment, anticipating that two of his goals will soon be fulfilled at once. His agent, Spoletta, arrives to report that Angelotti remains at large, but Cavaradossi has been arrested for questioning. He is brought in, and an interrogation ensues. As the painter steadfastly denies knowing anything about Angelotti’s escape, Tosca’s voice is heard singing a celebratory cantata elsewhere in the Palace.

She enters the apartment in time to see Cavaradossi being escorted to an antechamber. All he has time to say is that she mustn’t tell them anything. Scarpia then claims she can save her lover from indescribable pain if she reveals Angelotti’s hiding place. She resists, but the sound of screams coming through the door eventually breaks her down, and she tells Scarpia to search the well in the garden of Cavaradossi’s villa.

Scarpia orders his torturers to cease, and the bloodied painter is dragged back in. He is devastated to discover that Tosca has betrayed his friend. Sciarrone, another agent, then enters with news: there was an upset on the battlefield at Marengo, and the French are marching on Rome. Cavaradossi, unable to contain himself, gloats to Scarpia that his rule of terror will soon be at an end. This is enough for the police to consider him guilty, and they haul him away to be executed.

Scarpia, now alone with Tosca, proposes a bargain: if she gives herself to him, Cavaradossi will be freed. She is revolted, and repeatedly rejects his advances, but she hears the drums outside announcing an execution. As Scarpia awaits her decision, she prays, asking why God has abandoned her in her hour of need: “Vissi d’arte” (“I lived for art”). She tries to offer money, but Scarpia is not interested in that kind of bribe: he wants Tosca herself.

Spoletta returns with the news that Angelotti has killed himself upon discovery, and that everything is in place for Cavaradossi’s execution. Scarpia hesitates to give the order, looking to Tosca, and despairingly she agrees to submit to him. He tells Spoletta to arrange a mock execution, both men repeating that it will be “as we did with Count Palmieri”, and Spoletta exits.

Tosca insists that Scarpia must provide safe-conduct out of Rome for herself and Cavaradossi. He easily agrees to this and heads to his desk. While he’s drafting the document, she quietly takes a knife from the supper table. Scarpia triumphantly strides toward Tosca. When he begins to embrace her, she stabs him, crying “this is Tosca’s kiss!” Once she’s certain he’s dead, she ruefully says “now I forgive him.” She removes the safe-conduct from his pocket, lights candles in a gesture of piety, and places a crucifix on the body before leaving.

 

Act 3

THE UPPER PARTS OF THE CASTEL SANT’ANGELO, EARLY THE FOLLOWING MORNING

Roman panorama showing, centre, an arched bridge over a river with a domed building in the distance. To the right of the bridge is a large circular fortress.
The Castel Sant’Angelo (right), scene of the Tosca denouement, as painted in the 18th century
A shepherd boy is heard offstage singing (in Romanesco dialect) “Io de’ sospiri” (“I give you sighs”) as church bells sound for matins. The guards lead Cavaradossi in and a jailer informs him that he has one hour to live. He declines to see a priest, but asks permission to write a letter to Tosca. He begins to write, but is soon overwhelmed by memories: “E lucevan le stelle” (“And the stars shone”).

Tosca enters and shows him the safe-conduct pass she has obtained, adding that she has killed Scarpia and that the imminent execution is a sham. Cavaradossi must feign death, after which they can flee together before Scarpia’s body is discovered. Cavaradossi is awestruck by his gentle lover’s courage: “O dolci mani” (“Oh sweet hands”). The pair ecstatically imagine the life they will share, far from Rome. Tosca then anxiously coaches Cavaradossi on how to play dead when the firing squad shoots at him with blanks. He promises he will fall “like Tosca in the theatre”.

Cavaradossi is led away, and Tosca watches with increasing impatience as the firing squad prepares. The men fire, and Tosca praises the realism of his fall, “Ecco un artista!” (“What an actor!”). Once the soldiers have left, she hurries towards Cavaradossi, urging him, “Mario, su presto!” (“Mario, up quickly!”), only to find that Scarpia betrayed her: the bullets were real. Heartbroken, she clasps her lover’s lifeless body and weeps.

The voices of Spoletta, Sciarrone, and the soldiers are heard, shouting that Scarpia is dead and Tosca has killed him. As the men rush in, Tosca rises, evades their clutches, and runs to the parapet. Crying “O Scarpia, avanti a Dio!” (“O Scarpia, we meet before God!”), she flings herself over the edge to her death.

 

 

 

MORE INFO

https://www.aiaxspettacoli.com/tosca

 

WHERE TO STAY

Hotel La Pensione SvizzeraHotel Villa SchulerHotel Villa Ducale – Hotel Villa Carlotta

“Cavalleria Rusticana”

by Pietro Mascagni

 

and

“I Pagliacci”

by Ruggero Leoncavallo

 

Ancient Theatre, Friday 18th August 2023 @ 9.00pm

Co-production Taormina Arte and Hungarian State Opera House

 

Conductor Marco Guidarini

Direction by Georges Delnon

Lighting Design Bruno Ciulli

Maestro del Coro: Petrozziello

Chorus Francesco Cilea

Taormina Art Festival Orchestra

With Alessandra di Giorgio (Santuzza, Nedda), Marco Berti (Turiddu, Canio), Alberto Gazale (Alfio, Tonio), Annunziata Vestri (Lucia)

 

 

TICKETS on boxol and ticketone

Gallery: € 150,00
Upper Circle (non numbered circle): 50,00

 

 

PAGLIACCI – Synopsis

PLACE: Calabria, south Italy, near Montalto, on the Feast of the Assumption – Time: between 1865 and 1870.

Prologue
During the overture, the curtain rises. From behind a second curtain, Tonio, dressed as his commedia character Taddeo, addresses the audience (Si può?… Si può?… Signore! Signori! … Un nido di memorie). He reminds the audience that actors have feelings too, and that the show is about real people.

Act 1
At three o’clock in the afternoon, the commedia troupe enters the village to the cheering of the villagers. Canio describes the night’s performance: the troubles of Pagliaccio. He says the play will begin at “ventitré ore”, an agricultural method of time-keeping that means the play will begin an hour before sunset. As Nedda steps down from the cart, Tonio offers his hand, but Canio pushes him aside and helps her down himself. The villagers suggest drinking at the tavern. Canio and Beppe accept, but Tonio stays behind. The villagers tease Canio that Tonio is planning an affair with Nedda. Canio warns everyone that while he may act the foolish husband in the play, in real life he will not tolerate other men making advances to Nedda. Shocked, a villager asks if Canio really suspects her. He says no, and sweetly kisses her on the forehead. As the church bells ring vespers, he and Beppe leave for the tavern, leaving Nedda alone.

Nedda is frightened by Canio’s vehemence (Qual fiamma avea nel guardo), but the birdsong comforts her (Stridono lassù). Tonio returns and confesses his love for her, but she laughs. Enraged, Tonio grabs Nedda, but she takes a whip, strikes him and drives him off. Silvio, who is Nedda’s lover, comes from the tavern, where he has left Canio and Beppe drinking. He asks Nedda to elope with him after the performance and, though she is afraid, she agrees. Tonio, who has been eavesdropping, leaves to inform Canio so that he might catch Silvio and Nedda together. Canio and Tonio return and, as Silvio escapes, Nedda calls after him, “I will always be yours!”

Canio chases Silvio, but does not catch him and does not see his face. He demands that Nedda tell him the name of her lover, but she refuses. He threatens her with a knife, but Beppe disarms him. Beppe insists that they prepare for the performance. Tonio tells Canio that her lover will give himself away at the play. Canio is left alone to put on his costume and prepares to laugh (the famous Vesti la giubba – “Put on the costume”).

Act 2
As the crowd arrives, Nedda, costumed as Colombina, collects their money. She whispers a warning to Silvio, and the crowd cheers as the play begins.

Colombina’s husband Pagliaccio has gone away until morning, and Taddeo is at the market. She anxiously awaits her lover Arlecchino, who comes to serenade her from beneath her window. Taddeo returns and confesses his love, but she mocks him. She lets Arlecchino in through the window. He boxes Taddeo’s ears and kicks him out of the room, and the audience laughs.

Arlecchino and Colombina dine, and he gives her a sleeping potion to use later. When Pagliaccio returns, Colombina will drug him and elope with Arlecchino. Taddeo bursts in, warning that Pagliaccio is suspicious of his wife and is about to return. As Arlecchino escapes through the window, Colombina tells him, “I will always be yours!”

As Canio enters, he hears Nedda and exclaims “Name of God! Those same words!” He tries to continue the play, but loses control and demands to know her lover’s name. Nedda, hoping to keep to the performance, calls Canio by his stage name “Pagliaccio,” to remind him of the audience’s presence. He answers with his arietta: No! Pagliaccio non son! He sings that if his face is pale, it is not from the stage makeup but from the shame she has brought him. The crowd, impressed by his emotional performance, which they do not realize is real, cheers him.

Nedda, trying to continue the play, admits that she has been visited by the innocent Arlecchino. Canio, furious and forgetting the play, demands the name of her lover. Nedda swears she will never tell him, and the crowd realizes they are not acting. Silvio begins to fight his way toward the stage. Canio, grabbing a knife from the table, stabs Nedda. As she dies she calls: “Help! Silvio!”. Silvio attacks Canio, but Canio ends up killing him as well. After completing the murders, Canio turns to the horrified audience and proclaims the play’s now famous finishing line:

La Commedia è finita! – “The comedy is finished!”

 

 

CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA – Synopsis

Place: A 19th-century Sicilian village Time: Easter morning

Before the action takes place, the young villager Turiddu had returned from military service to find that his fiancée Lola had married the carter Alfio while Turiddu was away.[9] In revenge, Turiddu had seduced Santuzza, a young woman in the village. As the opera begins, Lola, overcome by her jealousy of Santuzza, has begun an adulterous affair with Turiddu.

The main square of the village

Offstage, Turiddu is heard singing The Siciliana – “O Lola, lovely as the spring’s bright blooms”. To one side is the church; to the other is Lucia’s wine shop and the house where she lives with her son, Turiddu. The villagers move about the square, singing of the beautiful spring day (Gli aranci olezzano sui verdi margini – “The air is sweet with orange blossoms”) and a hymn to the Blessed Virgin. Some villagers enter the church, and others wander off still singing.

Santuzza, having slept with Turiddu and suspecting that he has betrayed her for Lola, is distraught and approaches Lucia as she comes out of her house. Santuzza asks for Turiddu, but Lucia replies that he has gone to another town to fetch some wine. Santuzza tells her that he was seen during the night in the village. Lucia asks her inside to talk, but just at that moment Alfio arrives on his wagon, accompanied by the villagers. He praises the joys of a teamster’s life and the beauty of his bride. Alfio asks Lucia for some of her fine old wine. She tells him it has run out and Turiddu has gone away to buy more. Alfio replies that he had seen Turiddu early that morning near his cottage. Lucia starts to express surprise, but Santuzza stops her.

Alfio leaves. The choir inside the church is heard singing the Regina Coeli. Outside, the villagers sing an Easter Hymn, joined by Santuzza. The villagers enter the church, while Santuzza and Lucia remain outside. Lucia asks Santuzza why she signalled her to remain silent when Alfio said that he had seen Turiddu that morning. Santuzza exclaims, Voi lo sapete – “Now you shall know”, and tells Lucia the story of her seduction by Turiddu and his affair with Lola. Lucia pities Santuzza, who the villagers are considering excommunicating for her seduction. Santuzza cannot enter the church, but begs Lucia to go inside and pray for her.

Turiddu arrives. Santuzza upbraids him for pretending to have gone away, when he was actually seeing Lola. Lola enters the square singing. She mocks Santuzza and goes inside the church. Turiddu turns to follow Lola, but Santuzza begs him to stay. Turiddu pushes her away. She clings to him. He loosens her hands, throws her to the ground, and enters the church. Alfio arrives looking for Lola. Santuzza tells him that his wife has betrayed him with Turiddu. Alfio swears to take vendetta (revenge) which causes Santuzza to repent for having disclosed the affair and begs Alfio to stop to no avail.

The square is empty as the orchestra plays the famous Intermezzo.

The villagers come out of the church. Turiddu is in high spirits because he is with Lola and Santuzza appears to have gone. He invites his friends to his mother’s wine shop where he sings a drinking song, Viva, il vino spumeggiante – “Hail to the bubbling wine!”. Alfio joins them. Turiddu offers him wine, but he refuses it. All understand that trouble is in the air. The women leave, taking Lola with them. In a brief exchange of words, Alfio challenges Turiddu to a duel. Following Sicilian custom, the two men embrace, and Turiddu, in a token of acceptance, bites Alfio’s ear, drawing blood which signifies a fight to the death. Alfio leaves and Turiddu calls Lucia back. He tells her that he is going outside to get some air and asks that she be a kindly mother to Santuzza if he should not return: Un bacio, mamma! Un altro bacio!—Addio! – “One kiss, mother! One more kiss! – Farewell!”.

Turiddu rushes out. Lucia, weeping, wanders aimlessly around outside her house. Santuzza approaches and throws her arms around her. The villagers start to crowd around. Voices are heard in the distance and a woman cries, “They have murdered Turiddu!” Santuzza faints and Lucia collapses in the arms of the women villagers.

 

MORE INFO

Fondazione Taormina Arte – info@taorminaarte.org – T. 0039 391 746 2146

 

WHERE TO STAY

Hotel La Pensione SvizzeraHotel Villa SchulerHotel Villa Ducale – Hotel Villa Carlotta 

Jacopo Tissi (source: Globalist)

Past/Forward

TRA PASSATO E FUTURO

with Jacopo Tissi

Ancient Theatre, Thursday 17th August 2023 @ 9.30

 

Jacopo Tissi (born 13 February 1995) is an Italian ballet dancer. After stints at Vienna State Ballet and La Scala Theatre Ballet in Milan during his early career, he moved to Moscow to join the Bolshoi Ballet in 2016. He was named a principal dancer in December 2021, becoming one of the few foreigners to reach this position in the company’s history, but left in March 2022 over the Russian invasion of Ukraine. He returned to La Scala in the 2022–23 season as a guest principal dancer.

 

Tonight Jacopo Tissi is on stage with international ballet stars Polina Semionova, Alina Cojocaru, Ksenia Ovsyanick, David Motta Soares. Alejandro Villares

Choreography: Marius Petipa, Roland Petit, Christian Spuck, Yury Possokov, Alberto Alonso, George Williamson

 

TICKETS on boxol and ticketone

Platea : € 100,00
Gallery: € 80,00
Upper Circle (non numbered circle): 40,00

 

MORE INFO

www.instagram.com/jacopotissi

Fondazione Taormina Arte – info@taorminaarte.org – T. 0039 391 746 2146

 

 

WHERE TO STAY

Hotel La Pensione SvizzeraHotel Villa SchulerHotel Villa Ducale – Hotel Villa Carlotta 

“Cavalleria Rusticana”

by Pietro Mascagni

 

and

“I Pagliacci”

by Ruggero Leoncavallo

 

Ancient Theatre, Wednesday 16th August 2023 @ 9.00pm

Co-production Taormina Arte and Hungarian State Opera House

 

Conductor Marco Guidarini

Direction by Georges Delnon

Lighting Design Bruno Ciulli

Maestro del Coro: Petrozziello

Chorus Francesco Cilea

Taormina Art Festival Orchestra

With Alessandra di Giorgio (Santuzza, Nedda), Marco Berti (Turiddu, Canio), Alberto Gazale (Alfio, Tonio), Annunziata Vestri (Lucia)

 

TICKETS on boxol and ticketone

Gallery: € 150,00
Upper Circle (non numbered circle): 50,00

 

 

PAGLIACCI – Synopsis

PLACE: Calabria, south Italy, near Montalto, on the Feast of the Assumption – Time: between 1865 and 1870.

Prologue
During the overture, the curtain rises. From behind a second curtain, Tonio, dressed as his commedia character Taddeo, addresses the audience (Si può?… Si può?… Signore! Signori! … Un nido di memorie). He reminds the audience that actors have feelings too, and that the show is about real people.

Act 1
At three o’clock in the afternoon, the commedia troupe enters the village to the cheering of the villagers. Canio describes the night’s performance: the troubles of Pagliaccio. He says the play will begin at “ventitré ore”, an agricultural method of time-keeping that means the play will begin an hour before sunset. As Nedda steps down from the cart, Tonio offers his hand, but Canio pushes him aside and helps her down himself. The villagers suggest drinking at the tavern. Canio and Beppe accept, but Tonio stays behind. The villagers tease Canio that Tonio is planning an affair with Nedda. Canio warns everyone that while he may act the foolish husband in the play, in real life he will not tolerate other men making advances to Nedda. Shocked, a villager asks if Canio really suspects her. He says no, and sweetly kisses her on the forehead. As the church bells ring vespers, he and Beppe leave for the tavern, leaving Nedda alone.

Nedda is frightened by Canio’s vehemence (Qual fiamma avea nel guardo), but the birdsong comforts her (Stridono lassù). Tonio returns and confesses his love for her, but she laughs. Enraged, Tonio grabs Nedda, but she takes a whip, strikes him and drives him off. Silvio, who is Nedda’s lover, comes from the tavern, where he has left Canio and Beppe drinking. He asks Nedda to elope with him after the performance and, though she is afraid, she agrees. Tonio, who has been eavesdropping, leaves to inform Canio so that he might catch Silvio and Nedda together. Canio and Tonio return and, as Silvio escapes, Nedda calls after him, “I will always be yours!”

Canio chases Silvio, but does not catch him and does not see his face. He demands that Nedda tell him the name of her lover, but she refuses. He threatens her with a knife, but Beppe disarms him. Beppe insists that they prepare for the performance. Tonio tells Canio that her lover will give himself away at the play. Canio is left alone to put on his costume and prepares to laugh (the famous Vesti la giubba – “Put on the costume”).

Act 2
As the crowd arrives, Nedda, costumed as Colombina, collects their money. She whispers a warning to Silvio, and the crowd cheers as the play begins.

Colombina’s husband Pagliaccio has gone away until morning, and Taddeo is at the market. She anxiously awaits her lover Arlecchino, who comes to serenade her from beneath her window. Taddeo returns and confesses his love, but she mocks him. She lets Arlecchino in through the window. He boxes Taddeo’s ears and kicks him out of the room, and the audience laughs.

Arlecchino and Colombina dine, and he gives her a sleeping potion to use later. When Pagliaccio returns, Colombina will drug him and elope with Arlecchino. Taddeo bursts in, warning that Pagliaccio is suspicious of his wife and is about to return. As Arlecchino escapes through the window, Colombina tells him, “I will always be yours!”

As Canio enters, he hears Nedda and exclaims “Name of God! Those same words!” He tries to continue the play, but loses control and demands to know her lover’s name. Nedda, hoping to keep to the performance, calls Canio by his stage name “Pagliaccio,” to remind him of the audience’s presence. He answers with his arietta: No! Pagliaccio non son! He sings that if his face is pale, it is not from the stage makeup but from the shame she has brought him. The crowd, impressed by his emotional performance, which they do not realize is real, cheers him.

Nedda, trying to continue the play, admits that she has been visited by the innocent Arlecchino. Canio, furious and forgetting the play, demands the name of her lover. Nedda swears she will never tell him, and the crowd realizes they are not acting. Silvio begins to fight his way toward the stage. Canio, grabbing a knife from the table, stabs Nedda. As she dies she calls: “Help! Silvio!”. Silvio attacks Canio, but Canio ends up killing him as well. After completing the murders, Canio turns to the horrified audience and proclaims the play’s now famous finishing line:

La Commedia è finita! – “The comedy is finished!”

 

 

CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA – Synopsis

Place: A 19th-century Sicilian village Time: Easter morning

Before the action takes place, the young villager Turiddu had returned from military service to find that his fiancée Lola had married the carter Alfio while Turiddu was away.[9] In revenge, Turiddu had seduced Santuzza, a young woman in the village. As the opera begins, Lola, overcome by her jealousy of Santuzza, has begun an adulterous affair with Turiddu.

The main square of the village

Offstage, Turiddu is heard singing The Siciliana – “O Lola, lovely as the spring’s bright blooms”. To one side is the church; to the other is Lucia’s wine shop and the house where she lives with her son, Turiddu. The villagers move about the square, singing of the beautiful spring day (Gli aranci olezzano sui verdi margini – “The air is sweet with orange blossoms”) and a hymn to the Blessed Virgin. Some villagers enter the church, and others wander off still singing.

Santuzza, having slept with Turiddu and suspecting that he has betrayed her for Lola, is distraught and approaches Lucia as she comes out of her house. Santuzza asks for Turiddu, but Lucia replies that he has gone to another town to fetch some wine. Santuzza tells her that he was seen during the night in the village. Lucia asks her inside to talk, but just at that moment Alfio arrives on his wagon, accompanied by the villagers. He praises the joys of a teamster’s life and the beauty of his bride. Alfio asks Lucia for some of her fine old wine. She tells him it has run out and Turiddu has gone away to buy more. Alfio replies that he had seen Turiddu early that morning near his cottage. Lucia starts to express surprise, but Santuzza stops her.

Alfio leaves. The choir inside the church is heard singing the Regina Coeli. Outside, the villagers sing an Easter Hymn, joined by Santuzza. The villagers enter the church, while Santuzza and Lucia remain outside. Lucia asks Santuzza why she signalled her to remain silent when Alfio said that he had seen Turiddu that morning. Santuzza exclaims, Voi lo sapete – “Now you shall know”, and tells Lucia the story of her seduction by Turiddu and his affair with Lola. Lucia pities Santuzza, who the villagers are considering excommunicating for her seduction. Santuzza cannot enter the church, but begs Lucia to go inside and pray for her.

Turiddu arrives. Santuzza upbraids him for pretending to have gone away, when he was actually seeing Lola. Lola enters the square singing. She mocks Santuzza and goes inside the church. Turiddu turns to follow Lola, but Santuzza begs him to stay. Turiddu pushes her away. She clings to him. He loosens her hands, throws her to the ground, and enters the church. Alfio arrives looking for Lola. Santuzza tells him that his wife has betrayed him with Turiddu. Alfio swears to take vendetta (revenge) which causes Santuzza to repent for having disclosed the affair and begs Alfio to stop to no avail.

The square is empty as the orchestra plays the famous Intermezzo.

The villagers come out of the church. Turiddu is in high spirits because he is with Lola and Santuzza appears to have gone. He invites his friends to his mother’s wine shop where he sings a drinking song, Viva, il vino spumeggiante – “Hail to the bubbling wine!”. Alfio joins them. Turiddu offers him wine, but he refuses it. All understand that trouble is in the air. The women leave, taking Lola with them. In a brief exchange of words, Alfio challenges Turiddu to a duel. Following Sicilian custom, the two men embrace, and Turiddu, in a token of acceptance, bites Alfio’s ear, drawing blood which signifies a fight to the death. Alfio leaves and Turiddu calls Lucia back. He tells her that he is going outside to get some air and asks that she be a kindly mother to Santuzza if he should not return: Un bacio, mamma! Un altro bacio!—Addio! – “One kiss, mother! One more kiss! – Farewell!”.

Turiddu rushes out. Lucia, weeping, wanders aimlessly around outside her house. Santuzza approaches and throws her arms around her. The villagers start to crowd around. Voices are heard in the distance and a woman cries, “They have murdered Turiddu!” Santuzza faints and Lucia collapses in the arms of the women villagers.

 

MORE INFO

Fondazione Taormina Arte – info@taorminaarte.org – T. 0039 391 746 2146

 

WHERE TO STAY

Hotel La Pensione SvizzeraHotel Villa SchulerHotel Villa Ducale – Hotel Villa Carlotta 

Gianni Morandi

Go Gianni Go Tour

Ancient Theatre, 10th August 2023 @ 9.30pm

 

An italian monument.
An Italian piece of music history.
Gianni Morandi (born 1944) is THE good guy. A pop singer, actor and entertainer who started his career in 1962 and is still on the top.

 

 

TICKETS on ticketone
Platea: € 143,75
Gallery: € 120,75
Upper Circle (numbered seats): € 97.75
Upper Circle (non numbered circle): 57,50

 

MORE INFO

www.morandimania.it

www.facebook.com/giannimorandiofficial

 

 

WHERE TO STAY

Hotel La Pensione SvizzeraHotel Villa SchulerHotel Villa Ducale – Hotel Villa Carlotta

Angelo Duro

Ancient Theatre, Monday 7th August 2023 @9.30pm

 

Angelo Duro (born 1982) is an Italian comedian, writer, television personality and web influencer with 1.5 million followers. He is known for his cynical and controversial  character. Today’s show is “Sono cambiato” (I am changed)…is it for real?

 

TICKETS on ticketone
Platea: € 50,00
Gallery: € 50,00
Upper Circle (numbered seats): € 40,00
Upper Circle (non numbered circle): 30,00

 

MORE INFO

https://www.angeloduro.it

 

 

WHERE TO STAY

Hotel La Pensione SvizzeraHotel Villa SchulerHotel Villa Ducale – Hotel Villa Carlotta

Jimmy Sax and the Symphonic Dance Orchestra

Ancient Theatre Friday 4th August 2023 @ 9.30pm

 

Jim Rolland known as “Jimmy Sax” is an incredible saxophonist, multi-intrumentist, composer and entertainer more oriented towards electronic music.His track record of 1,500 shows, 1 million followers, 350 Million streams, 1 Platinum and 2 golden discs has turned him into a unique figure in in the world of saxophone and electronic music.
(source: https://www.youtube.com/@JimmySax/about)

 

TICKETS on ticketone
Platea: € 95,00
Gallery: € 85,00
Upper Circle (numbered seats): € 65,00
Upper Circle (non numbered circle): 46,00

 

 

MORE INFO

www.facebook.com/JimmySaxJimRolland

www.instagram.com/jimmysax/

 

 

 

WHERE TO STAY

Hotel La Pensione SvizzeraHotel Villa SchulerHotel Villa Ducale – Hotel Villa Carlotta