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Gianna Nannini

“La Differenza” Tour

Ancient Theatre, Saturday 21st August 2021 @ 9.30 pm

 

Gianna Nannini (born 14 June 1954) is the most famous Italian rock singer-songwriter. Her most notable songs include “America” (1979), “Fotoromanza” (1984) and “Bello e impossibile” (1986), the latter an international hit in Austria, Germany, Italy and Switzerland.
When she performs you can be sure that everyone will sing along her.

 

TICKETS on ticketone

Stalls (Parterre – Sector n. 1): 92,00
Gallery (Sector n. 2): € 79,90
Cavea (Upper circle – Sector n. 3): € 69,00

 

MORE INFO

www.giannanannini.com/en/

www.facebook.com/giannanannini

www.instagram.com/officialnannini

 

 

 

 

WHERE TO STAY

Hotel La Pensione SvizzeraHotel Villa SchulerHotel Villa Ducale – Hotel Villa Carlotta

FESTIVAL LIRICO DEI TEATRI DI PIETRA – ED. 2021

Ancient Theatre, Friday 20th August 2021 @ 9.30 pm

Cavalleria Rusticana

An opera by Pietro Mascagni

Filippo Arlia Maestro

 

AND

Dodici Anni dopo

Cavalleria’s Sequel

freely inspired by the drama written by Giovanni Grasso in 1917

music by Mario Menicagli
libretto by Lido Pacciardi adn Mario Menicagli
maestro Mario Menicagli

Francesco Costa chorus leader
Pierfrancesco Maestrini direction
Orchestra Filarmonica della Calabria
Coro Lirico Siciliano

 

Cavalleria Rusticana is an opera in one act by Pietro Mascagni (1863-1945) to an Italian libretto by Giovanni Targioni-Tozzetti and Guido Menasci, adapted from a play written by Giovanni Verga based on his short story. It is the first and best known Mascagni’s works. Its success has been phenomenal from its first performance in the Teatro Costanzi in Rome on May 17, 1890 until the present day. At the time of Mascagni’s death in 1945, the opera had been performed more than 14,000 times in Italy alone.

“The Teatro Illustrato invites young Italian musicians to participate in a new competition for a one-act opera.” In 1888, the publisher Sonzogno launched its second competition for young Italian composers. The winner was Pietro Mascagni with Cavalleria Rusticana, and so it was that this story of an honour killing in a Sicilian village in the late nineteenth century, from a short story of the same name by Verga, entered the operatic canon. Owing to the intense dramatic power of the score and libretto, the opera quickly became recognised as a manifesto of Italian verism.
(Source: symphonyspace.org)

 

TICKETS on ticketone and boxol

Gallery (central): € 122,00
Gallery (central): € 67,00/€72,00
Cavea (Lower circle – lateral): € 37,00/€ 42,00
Cavea (Lower circle – central): € n.a.
Cavea (upper circle – lateral): € 32,00/€ 27,00

 

MORE INFO

+39 351 546 0236 (Ph. and WhatsApp)

 

Synopsis

Place: A 19th-century Sicilian village
Time: Easter morning
Before the action takes place the young villager Turiddu returned from military service to find out that his fiancée Lola had married the carter Alfio while he was away. In revenge, Turiddu seduced Santuzza, a young woman in the village. As the opera begins, Lola, overcome by her jealousy of Santuzza, has begun an adulterous affair with Turiddu.

The main square of the village

Offstage, Turiddu is heard singing a siciliana, “O Lola c’hai di latti la cammisa” (“O Lola! like the snow, pure in thy whiteness!”). To one side is the church; to the other is Lucia’s wine shop and the house where she lives with her son, Turiddu. The villagers move about the square, singing of the beautiful spring day, “Gli aranci olezzano sui verdi margini” (“The air is sweet with orange blossoms”) and a hymn to the Blessed Virgin Mary. Some villagers enter the church, and others wander off still singing.

Santuzza, having slept with Turiddu and suspecting that he has betrayed her for Lola, is distraught and approaches Lucia as she comes out of her house. Santuzza asks for Turiddu, but Lucia replies that he has gone to another town to fetch some wine. Santuzza tells her that he was seen during the night in the village. Lucia asks her inside to talk, but just at that moment Alfio arrives on his wagon, accompanied by the villagers. He praises the joys of a teamster’s life and the beauty of Lola his bride. Alfio asks Lucia for some of her fine old wine. She tells him it has run out and Turiddu has gone away to buy more. Alfio replies that he had seen Turiddu early that morning near his cottage. Lucia starts to express surprise, but Santuzza stops her.

Alfio leaves. The choir inside the church is heard singing the Regina Coeli. Outside, the villagers sing an Easter Hymn, “Inneggiamo, il Signor non è morto” (“We rejoice that our Saviour is living!”) joined by Santuzza. The villagers enter the church, while Santuzza and Lucia remain outside. Lucia asks Santuzza why she signalled her to remain silent when Alfio said that he had seen Turiddu that morning. Santuzza exclaims, “Voi lo sapete” (“You well know”) and tells Lucia the story of her seduction by Turiddu and his affair with Lola. Lucia pities Santuzza, who feels dishonored, having been seduced by Turiddu only to be abandoned by him for his old flame, Lola. Santuzza feels she cannot enter the church, but begs Lucia to go inside herself and pray for Santuzza who stays behind to try to plead with Turiddu to leave Lola and return to her.

Santuzza pleads with Turiddu that he not go to meet with Lola again.
Turiddu arrives. Santuzza upbraids him for pretending to have gone away, when he was actually seeing Lola. Lola enters the square singing. She mocks Santuzza and goes inside the church. Turiddu turns to follow Lola, but Santuzza begs him to stay. Turiddu pushes her away. She clings to him. He loosens her hands, throws her to the ground, and enters the church. Alfio arrives looking for Lola. Santuzza tells him that his wife has betrayed him with Turiddu. Alfio swears to take vendetta (revenge) which causes Santuzza to repent for having disclosed the affair and begs Alfio to stop, but to no avail.

Turiddu bites Alfio’s ear
The villagers come out of the church. Turiddu is in high spirits because he is with Lola and Santuzza appears to have gone. He invites his friends to his mother’s wine shop where he sings a drinking song, “Viva, il vino spumeggiante” (“Hail to the bubbling wine!”). Alfio joins them. Turiddu offers him wine, but he refuses it. All understand that trouble is in the air. The women leave, taking Lola with them. In a brief exchange of words, Alfio challenges Turiddu to a duel. Following Sicilian custom, the two men embrace, and Turiddu, in a token of acceptance, bites Alfio’s ear, drawing blood which signifies a fight to the death. Alfio leaves and Turiddu calls Lucia back. He tells her that he is going outside to get some air and asks that she be a kindly mother to Santuzza if he should not return: “Un bacio, mamma! Un altro bacio!—Addio!” (“One kiss, mother! One more kiss! – Farewell!”).

Turiddu rushes out. Lucia, weeping, wanders aimlessly around outside her house. Santuzza approaches and throws her arms around her. The villagers start to crowd around. Voices are heard in the distance and a woman cries, “They have murdered Turiddu!” Santuzza faints and Lucia collapses in the arms of the women villagers.

 

 

 

WHERE TO STAY

Hotel La Pensione SvizzeraHotel Villa SchulerHotel Villa Ducale – Hotel Villa Carlotta

La Traviata and La Boheme Recital

Verdi vs Puccini

Tribute to Giuseppe Di Stefano
Festival dei Teatri di Pietra – Ed. 2021

Ancient Theatre, Thursday 19th, 2021 @ 9.30 pm

 

 

The most famous arias of the two greatest composers of the opera tradition: Giuseppe Verdi and Giacomo Puccini.

Suites from La Traviata, Rigoletto, Aida, Il Trovatore, La Boheme, Turandot, Tosca and others

 

 

TICKETS on ticketone

Gallery: € 47,00/62,00
Cavea (Upper circle – Sector n. 3): € 17,00/32,00

 

MORE INFO

+39 351 546 0236 (Ph. and WhatsApp)

 

 

WHERE TO STAY

Hotel La Pensione SvizzeraHotel Villa SchulerHotel Villa Ducale – Hotel Villa Carlotta

 

Al Passo coi Templi – Il Risveglio Degli Dei

Dawn at the Ancient Theatre of Taormina

Ancient Theatre, Wednesday 18th August 2021 @ 5.00 am!!

 

The Awakening of the Gods by and with Marco Savatteri (direction and music)

Produced by Casa del Musical and Fondazione Taormina Arte

 

Cast
Antonella Anastasi, Matteo Bertolotti, Annalisa Bono, Gloria Cacciatore, Gerlando Chianetta, Dario Coco, Claudia D’Agostino, Martina Di Caro, Annamaria Di Nolfo, Gabriel Glorioso, Licia Gueli, Francesca Licari, Gianleo Licata, Chiara Lo Faso, Ernesto Marciante, Chiara Peritore, Miriana Presti, Turi Scandura, Sabrina Spampinato, Sofia Torromacco, Vincenzo Vanadia

Chorus
Marcello Arcuri, Fabio Arena, Giada Bonomo, Giuliana Collea, Francesco Di Maida, Giorgia Gallo, Gaia Limblici, Alessandra Lupo, Giorgia Monreale, Beatrice Palumbo, Aurora Principato, Angelica Ribisi, Giulia Rizzuto, Mario Sinatra, Valeria Vassallo, Victoria Vassallo, Gloria Vilardo

and with the participation of Rossana Potenza and Silvio Laviano.

Direction: Marco Savatteri
Drama, Libretto and music: Marco Savatteri
Costumes e Accessories: Valentina Pollicino
Staging and Assistant Director: Gabriel Glorioso
Choral Arrangements: Ernesto Marciante
Orchestrations: Enrico M.R. Fallea
Stage Combat/ Fire Choreography: Turi Scandura
Stage manager: Sofia Cacciatore
Light & Sound Design: Pro Studios Vassallo – Christian Vassallo
Scenografia: Barbara Spallitta
Project Manager: Margherita Orlando
Production Management: Dino Mallia
Photo Credit: Elis Gjorretaj
Graphic Designer: Emmanuele D’Urso
Press Officer: Gioia Sgarlata

 

TICKETS on boxol

Stalls / Gallery: € 15,00
Cavea (Upper circle): € 10,00

Ticket Office in Taormina:
° Casa del Cinema > Corso Umberto 61 – mobile 0039 391 746 2146

 

MORE INFO

Fondazione Taormina Arte – www.taoarte.it

 www.facebook.com/casadelmusical – www.instagram.com/casadelmusical

 

 

 

WHERE TO STAY

Hotel La Pensione SvizzeraHotel Villa SchulerHotel Villa Ducale – Hotel Villa Carlotta

Musa e Getta

Odeon Theatre, Tuesday 17th August 2021 @ 9.30 pm

 

Sixteen writers for sixteen unforgettable (but sometimes forgotten) women, by Arianna Ninchi and Silvia Siravo. In the Italian language.

 

TICKETS on boxol.it at €12,00

Ticket Office in Taormina:

° Fondazione Taormina Arte > Corso Umberto 61 – mobile 0039 391 746 2146
° Tabacchi La 6 > Via Bagnoli Croci 90 – Ph. 0039 0942 23 226

 

MORE INFO

Fondazione Taormina Arte – www.taoarte.it

 

WHERE TO STAY

Hotel La Pensione SvizzeraHotel Villa SchulerHotel Villa Ducale – Hotel Villa Carlotta

Nel Ventre

Odeon Theatre, Friday 6th August 2020 @ 9.30 pm

 

Theatre play by Sergio Claudio Perroni with Stefano Panzeri.
Direction: Andrea Paolucci

 

Dramaturgical reduction of a novel by Sergio Claudio Perroni, with Stefano Panzeri, directed by Panzeri himself and Andrea Paolucci, a production by the Teatro dell’Argine.
A unique show that tells the story of a wait: Ulysses, Epeus (creator of the Trojan Horse), Neoptolemy (son of Achilles) and a handful of soldiers are hidden inside the horse outside the walls of Troy.

It is the last chapter of a very long war. The last Achaeans are inside the Horse, their companions have left the beach, the Trojans have seen them leave from behind the walls. What if the Trojans won’t accept that gift to the goddess Athena, will they burn it, throw it off a cliff? and if the trap prepared for Troy will become a trap for the Achaeans? The horse has no openings except the one that looks towards the sea, it is impossible to know what happens outside, … waiting, fear, doubt … a time-marking candle to know when it is necessary to get out of the trap door, and the rest is just waiting and silence.

 

TICKETS on boxol.it at €12,00

Ticket Office in Taormina:

° Casa del Cinema > Corso Umberto 61 – mobile 0039 391 746 2146

 

MORE INFO

Fondazione Taormina Arte – www.taoarte.it

 

WHERE TO STAY

Hotel La Pensione SvizzeraHotel Villa SchulerHotel Villa Ducale – Hotel Villa Carlotta

Le favole di Oscar Wilde

with Gabriele La Via

Ancient Theatre, Monday 16th 2021 @ 9.30 pm

 

Gabriele Lavia (ph Filippo Manzini)

Gabriele Lavia – a great master of the Italian theatre –  reads (in Italian) the fables of Oscar Wilde to an audience that has been away from the theaters perhaps too long.

Lavia wisely invites the audience to abandon themselves to fantastic stories which frequently allude to the contradictions of a morality that too often rules our life.

 

TICKETS on boxol.it

Stalls and Gallery: € 20,00
Cavea (Upper circle): € 10,00

 

MORE INFO

Gabriele Lavia (born 10 October 1942) is an Italian actor, film director and theatre director.

Lavia was born in Milan, Lombardy. Since 1970 he has had roles in nearly thirty films and television programs. He is known for his appearances in several horror films, including Beyond the Door (1974), Dario Argento’s Deep Red (1975), Inferno (1980), and Sleepless (2001), and Pupi Avati’s Zeder (1983).

In Italy, Lavia has had a long career as a theatrical actor and director. He was the artistic co-director of the Teatro Eliseo of Rome (from 1980 to 1987), artistic director of the Teatro Stabile of Turin (from 1997 to the 2000) and artistic director of the Taormina Film Fest (in 1993).

He has directed six films, most of which he has written or co-written, including Il Principe di Homburg (1983), based on Heinrich von Kleist’s play Prinz Friedrich von Homburg, for which he won the Nastro d’Argento Best New Director Award, and Sensi (U.S. title: Evil Senses) (1986), an erotic thriller with Monica Guerritore, his wife at the time.

 

WHERE TO STAY

Hotel La Pensione SvizzeraHotel Villa SchulerHotel Villa Ducale – Hotel Villa Carlotta

Rigoletto

an Opera by Giuseppe Verdi

Ancient Theatre, Friday 13th August 2021 @ 9.30 pm

 

Placido Domingo > conductor
Leo Nucci > direction
Carlo Centolavigna > scenes
Artemio Cabassi > costumes
Antonio Alaril > lights
Luigi Petrozziello > Conductor of the Chorus
Orchestra and Chorus > Teatro Bellini of Catania

 

CAST
Leo Nucci > Rigoletto
Federica Guida > Gilda
Stefan Pop > The Duke of Mantova (Mantua)
Antonio Di Matteo > Sparafucile
Anastasia Boldyreva > Maddalena
Maria Russo > Giovanna
Alessandro Busi > Monterone
Dario Giorgelè > Marullo
Dave Monaco > Borsa
Claudio Levantino>  Conte di Ceprano
Fulvia Mastrobuono > Il paggio

 

TICKETS on boxol

Gallery: € 62,00
Cavea (upper circle): € 32,00

 

IMPORTANT

If you are staying in a Sicilian accommodation (hotel, B&B, apartment, camping, etc.) you can get ONE FREE TICKET FOR EACH TICKET PURCHASED.
Ask the reception of your accommodation to send an email of accreditation to botteghino@teatromassimobellini.it (Ph. +39 095/7306135) then collect the tickets at the ticket office of the Ancient Theatre between 7.30 and 8.30 PM of the day. If you arrive later, you will have to pay for both.

 

 

Synopsis

Place: Mantua
Time: the sixteenth century

Act 1

Scene 1: Mantua. A magnificent hall in the ducal palace. Doors at the back open into other rooms, splendidly lit up. A crowd of lords and ladies in grand costumes are seen walking about in the rear rooms; page boys come and go. The festivities are at their height. Music is heard from offstage. The Duke and Borsa enter from a door in the back.

Act 1, scene 1: Victor Hugo’s Le Roi s’amuse
At a ball in his palace, the Duke sings of a life of pleasure with as many women as possible, and mentions that he particularly enjoys cuckolding his courtiers: “Questa o quella” (“This woman or that”). He mentions to Borsa that he has seen an unknown beauty in church and desires to possess her, but he also wishes to seduce the Countess of Ceprano. Rigoletto, the Duke’s hunchbacked court jester, mocks the husbands of the ladies to whom the Duke is paying attention, including the Count Ceprano. He humorously advises the Duke to get rid of Count Ceprano by prison, exile, or death. The Duke laughs indulgently, but Ceprano is not amused. Marullo, one of the guests at the ball, informs the courtiers that Rigoletto has a “lover”, which astonishes them. (Marullo is not aware that the “lover” is actually Rigoletto’s daughter.) The courtiers, at Ceprano’s suggestion, resolve to take vengeance on Rigoletto for making fun of them. The festivities are interrupted by the arrival of the elderly Count Monterone, whose daughter the Duke had seduced. Rigoletto provokes him further by making fun of his helplessness to avenge his daughter’s honor. Monterone confronts the Duke, and is immediately arrested by the Duke’s guards. Before being led off to prison, Monterone curses both the Duke for the attack on his daughter and Rigoletto for having mocked his righteous anger. The curse terrifies Rigoletto, who believes the popular superstition that an old man’s curse has real power.

Act 1, scene 2 stage set by Giuseppe Bertoja for the world premiere of Rigoletto
Scene 2: The end of a dead-end street. On the left, a house of discreet appearance with one small courtyard surrounded by walls. In the yard there is one tall tree and a marble seat; in the wall, a door that leads to the street; above the wall, a terrace supported by arches. The second floor door opens on to the said terrace, which can also be reached by a staircase in front. To the right of the street is the very high wall of the garden and a side of the Ceprano palace. It is night.

Preoccupied with the old man’s curse, Rigoletto approaches the house where he is concealing his daughter from the world and is accosted by the assassin Sparafucile, who walks up to him and offers his services. Rigoletto declines for the moment, but leaves open the possibility of hiring Sparafucile later, should the need arise. Sparafucile wanders off, after repeating his own name a few times. Rigoletto contemplates the similarities between the two of them: “Pari siamo!” (“We are alike!”); Sparafucile kills men with his sword, and Rigoletto uses “a tongue of malice” to stab his victims. Rigoletto opens a door in the wall and embraces his daughter Gilda. They greet each other warmly: “Figlia!” “Mio padre!” (“Daughter!” “My father!”). Rigoletto has been concealing his daughter from the Duke and the rest of the city, and she does not know her father’s occupation. Since he has forbidden her to appear in public, she has been nowhere except to church and does not even know her own father’s name.

When Rigoletto has gone, the Duke appears and overhears Gilda confess to her nurse Giovanna that she feels guilty for not having told her father about a young man she had met at the church. She says that she fell in love with him, but that she would love him even more if he were a student and poor. As she declares her love, the Duke enters, overjoyed. Gilda, alarmed, calls for Giovanna, unaware that the Duke had given her money to go away. Pretending to be a student, the Duke convinces Gilda of his love: “È il sol dell’anima” (“Love is the sunshine of the soul”). When she asks for his name, he hesitantly calls himself Gualtier Maldè. Hearing sounds and fearing that her father has returned, Gilda sends the Duke away after they quickly trade vows of love: “Addio, addio” (“Farewell, farewell”). Alone, Gilda meditates on her love for the Duke, whom she believes is a student: “Gualtier Maldè!… Caro nome che il mio cor” (“Dearest name”).

Later, Rigoletto returns: “Riedo!… perché?” (“I’ve returned!… why?”), while the hostile courtiers outside the walled garden (believing Gilda to be the jester’s mistress, unaware she is his daughter) get ready to abduct the helpless girl. They tell Rigoletto that they are actually abducting the Countess Ceprano. He sees that they are masked and asks for a mask for himself; while they are tying the mask onto his face, they also blindfold him. Blindfolded and deceived, he holds the ladder steady while they climb up to Gilda’s room: Chorus: “Zitti, zitti” (“Softly, softly”). With her father’s unknowing assistance Gilda is carried away by the courtiers. Left alone, Rigoletto removes his mask and blindfold, and realizes that it was in fact Gilda who was carried away. He collapses in despair, remembering the old man’s curse.

Act 2

A room in the ducal palace. There are doors on both sides as well as a larger one at the far end by the sides of which hang full length portraits of the Duke and his wife. There is one high-backed chair at a table covered with velvet and other furnishings.

The Duke is concerned that Gilda has disappeared: “Ella mi fu rapita!” (“She was stolen from me!”) and “Parmi veder le lagrime” (“I seem to see tears”). The courtiers then enter and inform him that they have captured Rigoletto’s mistress: Chorus: “Scorrendo uniti” (“We went together at nightfall”). By their description, he recognizes it to be Gilda and rushes off to the room where she is held: “Possente amor mi chiama” (“Mighty love beckons me”). Rigoletto enters singing and feigning nonchalance, but also looking anxiously for any trace of Gilda, whom he fears may have fallen into the hands of the Duke. The courtiers pretend not to notice his anxiety, but quietly laugh at him with each other. A page boy arrives with a message from the Duke’s wife – the Duchess wishes to speak to her husband – but the courtiers reply suggestively that the Duke cannot be disturbed at the moment. Rigoletto realizes this must mean that Gilda is with the Duke. To the courtiers’ surprise, he reveals that Gilda is his daughter. He first demands, then tearfully pleads with the courtiers to return her to him: “Cortigiani, vil razza dannata” (“Accursed race of courtiers”). Rigoletto attempts to run into the room in which Gilda is being held, but the courtiers block his way. After a time, Gilda enters, and Rigoletto orders the courtiers to leave him alone with her. The courtiers leave the room, believing Rigoletto has gone mad. Gilda describes to her father what has happened to her in the palace: “Tutte le feste al tempio” (“On all the holy days”) and he attempts to console her. Monterone is led across the room on the way to prison and pauses in front of the portrait of the Duke to regret that his curse on the libertine has had no effect. As the guards lead Monterone away, Rigoletto mutters that the old man is mistaken; he, Rigoletto, the dishonored buffoon, shall make thunder and lightning rain from heaven onto the offender’s head. He repeats this vow as Gilda pleads for mercy for her lover the Duke: Duet:”Sì! Vendetta, tremenda vendetta!” (“Yes! Revenge, terrible revenge!”).

 

Act 3

The right bank of the river Mincio. On the left is a two-story house, half ruined. Through a large arch on the ground floor a rustic tavern can be seen as well as a rough stone staircase that leads to an attic room with a small bed which is in full view as there are no shutters. In the wall downstairs that faces the street is a door that opens to the inside. The wall is so full of holes and cracks that everything that happens inside is easily seen from the exterior. At the back of the stage are deserted areas by the river which flows behind a parapet that has half collapsed into ruins. Beyond the river is Mantua. It is night. Gilda and Rigoletto, both uneasy, are standing in the road; Sparafucile is seated at a table in the tavern.

A portion of Sparafucile’s house is seen, with two rooms open to the view of the audience. Rigoletto and Gilda arrive outside. The Duke’s voice can be heard from inside, singing “La donna è mobile” (“Woman is fickle”). Sparafucile’s sister, Maddalena, has lured him to the house. Rigoletto and Gilda listen from outside as the Duke flirts with Maddalena. Gilda laments that the Duke is unfaithful; Rigoletto assures her that he is arranging revenge: “Bella figlia dell’amore” (“Beautiful daughter of love”).

Rigoletto orders Gilda to put on a man’s clothes to prepare to leave for Verona and tells her that he plans to follow later. After she leaves, he completes his bargain with the assassin, who is ready to murder his guest for 20 scudi. Rigoletto then withdraws.

With falling darkness, a thunderstorm approaches and the Duke decides to spend the rest of the night in the house. Sparafucile directs him to the upstairs sleeping quarters, resolving to kill him in his sleep.

Gilda, who still loves the Duke despite knowing him to be unfaithful, returns dressed as a man and stands outside the house. Maddalena, who is smitten with the Duke, begs Sparafucile to spare his life: “È amabile invero cotal giovinotto/ Ah, più non ragiono!”. Sparafucile reluctantly promises her that if by midnight another victim can be found, he will kill the other instead of the Duke. Gilda, overhearing this exchange, resolves to sacrifice herself for the Duke, and enters the house: “Trio: Se pria ch’abbia il mezzo la notte toccato”. Sparafucile stabs her and she collapses, mortally wounded.

At midnight, when Rigoletto arrives with money, he receives a corpse wrapped in a sack, and rejoices in his triumph. Weighting it with stones, he is about to cast the sack into the river when he hears the voice of the Duke, sleepily singing a reprise of his “La donna è mobile” aria. Bewildered, Rigoletto opens the sack and, to his despair, discovers his dying daughter. For a moment, she revives and declares she is glad to die for her beloved: “V’ho ingannato” (“Father, I deceived you”). She dies in his arms. Rigoletto cries out in horror: “La maledizione!” (“The curse!”)[22]

 

 

WHERE TO STAY

Hotel La Pensione SvizzeraHotel Villa SchulerHotel Villa Ducale – Hotel Villa Carlotta

Concerto per l’Etna

Concert for Mount Etna

Odeon Theatre, Monday 2nd August 2021 @ 9.30 pm

 

With Luciano Troja (piano), Antonino Cicero (fagott), Giampiero Cicciò (recital voice), Giovanni Tomarchio (video) and Giuseppe Riggio (choice of texts and photography).
A multidisciplinary and multimedia show, a tribute to Mount Etna, to its incomparable beauty. Music, theater, photography, video to testify to the grandeur and majesty of the most impressive and active volcano in the world.

 

 

TICKETS on boxol.it at €12,00

Ticket Office in Taormina:

° Casa del Cinema > Corso Umberto 61 – mobile 0039 391 746 2146

 

MORE INFO

Fondazione Taormina Arte – www.taoarte.it

 

WHERE TO STAY

Hotel La Pensione SvizzeraHotel Villa SchulerHotel Villa Ducale – Hotel Villa Carlotta

 

 

Rigoletto

an Opera by Giuseppe Verdi

Ancient Theatre, Wednesday 11th August 2021 @ 9.30 pm

 

Placido Domingo > conductor
Leo Nucci > direction
Carlo Centolavigna > scenes
Artemio Cabassi > costumes
Antonio Alaril > lights
Luigi Petrozziello > Conductor of the Chorus
Orchestra and Chorus > Teatro Bellini of Catania

 

CAST
Leo Nucci > Rigoletto
Federica Guida > Gilda
Stefan Pop > The Duke of Mantova (Mantua)
Antonio Di Matteo > Sparafucile
Anastasia Boldyreva > Maddalena
Maria Russo > Giovanna
Alessandro Busi > Monterone
Dario Giorgelè > Marullo
Dave Monaco > Borsa
Claudio Levantino >  Conte di Ceprano
Fulvia Mastrobuono > Il paggio

 

TICKETS on boxol

Gallery: € 62,00
Cavea (upper circle): € 32,00

 

IMPORTANT

If you are staying in a Sicilian accommodation (hotel, B&B, apartment, camping, etc.) you can get ONE FREE TICKET FOR EACH TICKET PURCHASED.
Ask the reception of your accommodation to send an email of accreditation to botteghino@teatromassimobellini.it (Ph. +39 095/7306135) then collect the tickets at the ticket office of the Ancient Theatre between 7.30 and 8.30 PM of the day. If you arrive later, you will have to pay for both.

 

Synopsis

Place: Mantua
Time: the sixteenth century

Act 1

Scene 1: Mantua. A magnificent hall in the ducal palace. Doors at the back open into other rooms, splendidly lit up. A crowd of lords and ladies in grand costumes are seen walking about in the rear rooms; page boys come and go. The festivities are at their height. Music is heard from offstage. The Duke and Borsa enter from a door in the back.

Act 1, scene 1: Victor Hugo’s Le Roi s’amuse
At a ball in his palace, the Duke sings of a life of pleasure with as many women as possible, and mentions that he particularly enjoys cuckolding his courtiers: “Questa o quella” (“This woman or that”). He mentions to Borsa that he has seen an unknown beauty in church and desires to possess her, but he also wishes to seduce the Countess of Ceprano. Rigoletto, the Duke’s hunchbacked court jester, mocks the husbands of the ladies to whom the Duke is paying attention, including the Count Ceprano. He humorously advises the Duke to get rid of Count Ceprano by prison, exile, or death. The Duke laughs indulgently, but Ceprano is not amused. Marullo, one of the guests at the ball, informs the courtiers that Rigoletto has a “lover”, which astonishes them. (Marullo is not aware that the “lover” is actually Rigoletto’s daughter.) The courtiers, at Ceprano’s suggestion, resolve to take vengeance on Rigoletto for making fun of them. The festivities are interrupted by the arrival of the elderly Count Monterone, whose daughter the Duke had seduced. Rigoletto provokes him further by making fun of his helplessness to avenge his daughter’s honor. Monterone confronts the Duke, and is immediately arrested by the Duke’s guards. Before being led off to prison, Monterone curses both the Duke for the attack on his daughter and Rigoletto for having mocked his righteous anger. The curse terrifies Rigoletto, who believes the popular superstition that an old man’s curse has real power.

Act 1, scene 2 stage set by Giuseppe Bertoja for the world premiere of Rigoletto
Scene 2: The end of a dead-end street. On the left, a house of discreet appearance with one small courtyard surrounded by walls. In the yard there is one tall tree and a marble seat; in the wall, a door that leads to the street; above the wall, a terrace supported by arches. The second floor door opens on to the said terrace, which can also be reached by a staircase in front. To the right of the street is the very high wall of the garden and a side of the Ceprano palace. It is night.

Preoccupied with the old man’s curse, Rigoletto approaches the house where he is concealing his daughter from the world and is accosted by the assassin Sparafucile, who walks up to him and offers his services. Rigoletto declines for the moment, but leaves open the possibility of hiring Sparafucile later, should the need arise. Sparafucile wanders off, after repeating his own name a few times. Rigoletto contemplates the similarities between the two of them: “Pari siamo!” (“We are alike!”); Sparafucile kills men with his sword, and Rigoletto uses “a tongue of malice” to stab his victims. Rigoletto opens a door in the wall and embraces his daughter Gilda. They greet each other warmly: “Figlia!” “Mio padre!” (“Daughter!” “My father!”). Rigoletto has been concealing his daughter from the Duke and the rest of the city, and she does not know her father’s occupation. Since he has forbidden her to appear in public, she has been nowhere except to church and does not even know her own father’s name.

When Rigoletto has gone, the Duke appears and overhears Gilda confess to her nurse Giovanna that she feels guilty for not having told her father about a young man she had met at the church. She says that she fell in love with him, but that she would love him even more if he were a student and poor. As she declares her love, the Duke enters, overjoyed. Gilda, alarmed, calls for Giovanna, unaware that the Duke had given her money to go away. Pretending to be a student, the Duke convinces Gilda of his love: “È il sol dell’anima” (“Love is the sunshine of the soul”). When she asks for his name, he hesitantly calls himself Gualtier Maldè. Hearing sounds and fearing that her father has returned, Gilda sends the Duke away after they quickly trade vows of love: “Addio, addio” (“Farewell, farewell”). Alone, Gilda meditates on her love for the Duke, whom she believes is a student: “Gualtier Maldè!… Caro nome che il mio cor” (“Dearest name”).

Later, Rigoletto returns: “Riedo!… perché?” (“I’ve returned!… why?”), while the hostile courtiers outside the walled garden (believing Gilda to be the jester’s mistress, unaware she is his daughter) get ready to abduct the helpless girl. They tell Rigoletto that they are actually abducting the Countess Ceprano. He sees that they are masked and asks for a mask for himself; while they are tying the mask onto his face, they also blindfold him. Blindfolded and deceived, he holds the ladder steady while they climb up to Gilda’s room: Chorus: “Zitti, zitti” (“Softly, softly”). With her father’s unknowing assistance Gilda is carried away by the courtiers. Left alone, Rigoletto removes his mask and blindfold, and realizes that it was in fact Gilda who was carried away. He collapses in despair, remembering the old man’s curse.

Act 2

A room in the ducal palace. There are doors on both sides as well as a larger one at the far end by the sides of which hang full length portraits of the Duke and his wife. There is one high-backed chair at a table covered with velvet and other furnishings.

The Duke is concerned that Gilda has disappeared: “Ella mi fu rapita!” (“She was stolen from me!”) and “Parmi veder le lagrime” (“I seem to see tears”). The courtiers then enter and inform him that they have captured Rigoletto’s mistress: Chorus: “Scorrendo uniti” (“We went together at nightfall”). By their description, he recognizes it to be Gilda and rushes off to the room where she is held: “Possente amor mi chiama” (“Mighty love beckons me”). Rigoletto enters singing and feigning nonchalance, but also looking anxiously for any trace of Gilda, whom he fears may have fallen into the hands of the Duke. The courtiers pretend not to notice his anxiety, but quietly laugh at him with each other. A page boy arrives with a message from the Duke’s wife – the Duchess wishes to speak to her husband – but the courtiers reply suggestively that the Duke cannot be disturbed at the moment. Rigoletto realizes this must mean that Gilda is with the Duke. To the courtiers’ surprise, he reveals that Gilda is his daughter. He first demands, then tearfully pleads with the courtiers to return her to him: “Cortigiani, vil razza dannata” (“Accursed race of courtiers”). Rigoletto attempts to run into the room in which Gilda is being held, but the courtiers block his way. After a time, Gilda enters, and Rigoletto orders the courtiers to leave him alone with her. The courtiers leave the room, believing Rigoletto has gone mad. Gilda describes to her father what has happened to her in the palace: “Tutte le feste al tempio” (“On all the holy days”) and he attempts to console her. Monterone is led across the room on the way to prison and pauses in front of the portrait of the Duke to regret that his curse on the libertine has had no effect. As the guards lead Monterone away, Rigoletto mutters that the old man is mistaken; he, Rigoletto, the dishonored buffoon, shall make thunder and lightning rain from heaven onto the offender’s head. He repeats this vow as Gilda pleads for mercy for her lover the Duke: Duet:”Sì! Vendetta, tremenda vendetta!” (“Yes! Revenge, terrible revenge!”).

 

Act 3

The right bank of the river Mincio. On the left is a two-story house, half ruined. Through a large arch on the ground floor a rustic tavern can be seen as well as a rough stone staircase that leads to an attic room with a small bed which is in full view as there are no shutters. In the wall downstairs that faces the street is a door that opens to the inside. The wall is so full of holes and cracks that everything that happens inside is easily seen from the exterior. At the back of the stage are deserted areas by the river which flows behind a parapet that has half collapsed into ruins. Beyond the river is Mantua. It is night. Gilda and Rigoletto, both uneasy, are standing in the road; Sparafucile is seated at a table in the tavern.

A portion of Sparafucile’s house is seen, with two rooms open to the view of the audience. Rigoletto and Gilda arrive outside. The Duke’s voice can be heard from inside, singing “La donna è mobile” (“Woman is fickle”). Sparafucile’s sister, Maddalena, has lured him to the house. Rigoletto and Gilda listen from outside as the Duke flirts with Maddalena. Gilda laments that the Duke is unfaithful; Rigoletto assures her that he is arranging revenge: “Bella figlia dell’amore” (“Beautiful daughter of love”).

Rigoletto orders Gilda to put on a man’s clothes to prepare to leave for Verona and tells her that he plans to follow later. After she leaves, he completes his bargain with the assassin, who is ready to murder his guest for 20 scudi. Rigoletto then withdraws.

With falling darkness, a thunderstorm approaches and the Duke decides to spend the rest of the night in the house. Sparafucile directs him to the upstairs sleeping quarters, resolving to kill him in his sleep.

Gilda, who still loves the Duke despite knowing him to be unfaithful, returns dressed as a man and stands outside the house. Maddalena, who is smitten with the Duke, begs Sparafucile to spare his life: “È amabile invero cotal giovinotto/ Ah, più non ragiono!”. Sparafucile reluctantly promises her that if by midnight another victim can be found, he will kill the other instead of the Duke. Gilda, overhearing this exchange, resolves to sacrifice herself for the Duke, and enters the house: “Trio: Se pria ch’abbia il mezzo la notte toccato”. Sparafucile stabs her and she collapses, mortally wounded.

At midnight, when Rigoletto arrives with money, he receives a corpse wrapped in a sack, and rejoices in his triumph. Weighting it with stones, he is about to cast the sack into the river when he hears the voice of the Duke, sleepily singing a reprise of his “La donna è mobile” aria. Bewildered, Rigoletto opens the sack and, to his despair, discovers his dying daughter. For a moment, she revives and declares she is glad to die for her beloved: “V’ho ingannato” (“Father, I deceived you”). She dies in his arms. Rigoletto cries out in horror: “La maledizione!” (“The curse!”)[22]

 

 

WHERE TO STAY

Hotel La Pensione SvizzeraHotel Villa SchulerHotel Villa Ducale – Hotel Villa Carlotta